National Crisis: a rousing motivational film for all Britons

Hard to believe it’s 25 years since this film, reserved for times of national crisis, was first shown on The Day Today. Click on the link here to watch, 2 mins or so: 
The Day Today – Film Reserved For Times of National Crisis

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The brotherhood of flags

As the clock ticks down to 29th March, repeat to yourself the narrator’s empty reassurance to us all at the end:

This is Britain and everything’s alright. Everything’s alright. It’s OK. It’s fine.

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Cheer up, doctor, no one’s died. Not yet ..

If nothing else, the next few weeks are going to test our much vaunted national GSOH. So put your laughing socks on and settle in. If you don’t laugh, you’ll cry, as they say.

By coincidence, following The Day Today writer, performer and ardent Remainer David Schneider on twitter (@davidschneider), he posted the picture below on the same day as this blog post. It turns out the The Day Today people got together for a 25th anniversary dinner the other night. As Collately Sisters might have said: “In summary: wish I was a bit younger.” But they have aged gracefully and gone on to other great things, from Brass Eye to Alan Partridge to Death of Stalin to Outnumbered to Veep to IT Crowd to Borat to The Thick Of It to Smack The Pony to Toast of London to, yes, War and Peace (the latter featured Rebecca Front, whose dad btw designed the Beatles logo on the cover of Rubber Soul):

The Day Today 25 years

The news has turned silver, Chris: Front, Iannucci, Mackichan, Baynham, Marber, Coogan, Morris, Schneider in their cups

Oh and a special mention for Chris Morris’s interviews a while back with Sir Arthur Streeb-Greebling (the late Peter Cooke) – genius stuff if you ever get hold of them. A starter is here Sir Arthur Streeb-Greebling.

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About Simon Riley

Qualitative researcher in the UK. I listen to people from all walks of life and think about what it all means. I work for leading brands, media companies and government.
This entry was posted in 21st Century Britain, Society and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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