Brexit brands: catching up with the left behind

Campaign: Brands Favoured by Remainers and Leavers

Back at my desk / wheel / digi-recorder, I wanted to register this article I missed in August before we all move on and forget the summer ever happened (some of us would prefer to; but every day I wake up and it turns out it still did). It’s the first of a few blog posts about the dreaded issue we can’t get away from now for the foreseeable future, Brexit.

If anyone can do it, Branson can

If anyone can do it, Branson can

I first read about this study of brands favoured by Leave vs Remain voters in the new ‘pop up’ print newspaper venture  The New European (which went from wild idea to print run in less than two weeks earlier in the summer – a pretty remarkable event in itself). Needless to say in my neck of the woods, central Oxford, we have The New European on display outside the local Co-Op. That’s because it’s one of those ardently ‘Remain’ bubbles that are dotted around the country, in not quite big enough numbers. Oxford also voted ‘Yes’ in the Alternative Vote Referendum, 2011 – remember that one?  No, I didn’t think so.

There is much to be said about the referendum but for now, I offer just some brief ruminations on the fascinating list of brands generating by some nice big data stats crunching by RKCR/Y&R and YouGov.

The brands most favoured by Remain voters apparently are:

Living in someone else's house trying not to mess it up does not relax me but it takes all sorts. It's new, innit. Kind of. Represents the new economy anyway. I'm a curmudgeon about all this cutting out the middle man stuff tbh. I like middle men.

Living in someone else’s house trying not to mess it up does not relax me but it takes all sorts. It’s new, innit. Kind of. Represents the new economy anyway. I’m a curmudgeon about all this cutting out the middle man stuff tbh. I like middle men. Underrated.

BBC.co.uk
BBC iPlayer
Instagram
London Underground
Spotify
Airbnb
LinkedIn
Virgin Trains
Twitter
EasyJet

The Brexiteers however have quite a different list:

HP Sauce
Bisto
ITV News
The Health Lottery
Birds Eye
Iceland
Sky News
Cathedral City
PG Tips
Richmond sausages

Emily James of RKCR/Y&R summed up the Leave brands list as “traditional, straightforward, simple, down-to-earth, good value and friendly.” I’m fond of several of these myself but overall I think that’s quite a diplomatic description. We have to be diplomatic in this game, as we’ll probably end up doing branding research for one of them eventually. I’ve already worked on a couple of that list. But it doesn’t reflect the outward-looking, buccaneering version of Britain that the Leave campaign claimed Brexit was all about.

James describes the Remain brands, on the other hand, as “progressive, up-to-date, visionary, innovative, socially responsible, intelligent.” And wasn’t this really the divide in British society that Brexit has revealed? It is, by the way, most definitely ‘revealed’, not caused: in my view the vote wasn’t that much about the EU at all. It’s the coming home to roost of decades of social sundering.

The divide is between, on the one hand, the self-confident part of Britain that is not just at ease with modernity and change but actually driving it; and on the other hand, those parts of Britain that either got left behind or who never wanted to be part of that project in the first place.

It’s easy, especially if you’re a Remainer like me, to paint the two in Manichean terms – that Remain is progressive, liberal, open and optimistic and that Leavers are the opposite of those things. And there are some Leavers who are indeed dangerously stuck in the past, intolerant and inward-looking. But it would be short-sighted to write off all of the 52 per cent of the British population quite like that.

Birdseye: not a man to be ignored. No more EU quotas for him. His parrot though is still advocating an Australian-style points system for fish fingers. That ship has sailed, move on Polly

Birdseye: not a man to be ignored. No more EU quotas for him. His parrot though is still advocating an Australian-style points system for fish fingers. That ship has sailed, move on Polly

There is a positive to come out of this for us in a ‘progressive’ bubble: we can no longer ignore, patronise or marginalise such vast swathes of our fellow country people and expect this to have no negative consequences. Britain has been a deeply divided country for some time between people who benefit from the status quo and people who don’t. Those of us who are reaping the benefits should perhaps have listened more carefully to those who haven’t and we should have done something about it earlier. Perhaps now – too late? – we can start to understand there are other Britains beyond the ones we personally inhabit – and they can look very different. They are interesting and they all count.

There is a third list of brands, ones that have somehow managed to connect across this perilously divided nation. These brands are split equally between Remainers and Leavers:

Money Saving Expert
NSPCC
TK Maxx
M&S

Look at all the money Martin Lewis has made. He possibly should have made it in smaller, more portable denominations. How's he going to buy a packet of cheese 'n' onion with that?

Look at all the money Martin Lewis has made. He possibly should have made it in smaller, more portable denominations. How’s he going to buy a packet of cheese ‘n’ onion with that?

Martin Lewis, Mr Money Saving Expert himself, regularly features near the top of list of the most trusted people in Britain, usually right behind the almost deified David Attenborough. Lewis has a phenomenal and rare combination of qualities: the ability to fully understand complexity, render it simple and explain it clearly and engagingly. Sounds simple but no one can do it quite like him. He’s great on the tv, he’s amazing on the radio and he can write. The magic ingredient though is this: he gets that his area of expertise isn’t innately engrossing for most people. Life is about, well, life – not money, for most of us. He doesn’t look down on us for that, or think we’re lazy or stupid for it. He accepts us. And thus a relationship is built. Add to that that he seems to know his stuff backwards and we readily trust him and hang on his words. Qual researchers presenting our insights can learn a lot from Lewis.

M&S is another success story. A bit too upmarket though for Brexiters? That would be to underestimate two things: (1) how many affluent middle class people are Brexiters; and (2) M&S’s symbolism as an aspirational food shopping brand to people who can’t afford to shop there much. The way we do our food shopping now, increasingly in fits and starts, many of us have repertoires of stores that include both an M&S and an Aldi, or a Waitrose and an ASDA. It’s easier now for a premium retail brand to be relevant across SEGs; and the same goes for a value-driven retail brand. Look at the rise of the likes of Home Bargains and B&M. I interviewed shoppers in those stores earlier in the year. It was fascinating to see their recent evolution and how much shoppers are now embracing them. They are now becoming very mainstream places to shop and they have changed to reflect that.

So perhaps to surf on the crest of the post-Brexit divide, as we researchers have to, we don’t have to go to Iceland (and endure the orange glare off the faces of Peter Andre, Jason Donovan and Kerry Katona). The reassuringly expensive lure of Marks and Spencer’s is still something Remainers and Leavers can agree on.

See also: BBC News online: BBC – Brexit brands, divided Britain

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About Simon Riley

Qualitative researcher in the UK. I listen to people from all walks of life and think about what it all means. I work for leading brands, media companies and government.
This entry was posted in 21st Century Britain, Brand communications, Society and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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