Systems 1 and 2: an accessible summary by TNS

… not that Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking Fast and Slow isn’t accessible – it’s a must-read and a good read – but I enjoyed this TNS paper. It’s a 14 page distillation of some of the main points about System 1 and 2 thinking. Brevity is always welcome. Life’s too short, is it not? Especially if you’reContinue reading “Systems 1 and 2: an accessible summary by TNS”

Innovation that actually helps people: a radical rethink of working gloves

Qual research is often part of a much bigger and longer process, be it developing a new product, creating an ad or segmenting customers. So it’s satisfying when you see something you have worked on come to fruition. I’ve really enjoyed working with Swedish design agency Pond on a couple of projects now, ethnographic workContinue reading “Innovation that actually helps people: a radical rethink of working gloves”

Too much choice?

Peter Curran hosts an interesting debate on whether too much choice is actually bad for society, on the iai online tv channel. Making the case is Renata Salecl, opposing is Lou Marinoff and somewhere between them is Lynne Segal. Choice: debate from the Institute of Art and Ideas

Factoid of the day: qual is worth $6.37billion a year

Thanks to Italian ICG member Marcello Sasso for this, in response to a question from Sheila Keegan on the ICG email chatter thread: she asked, how much qual is done globally every year? Marcello quoted the 2011 ESOMAR figures on this. Qual research accounts for 19 per cent of global market research turnover (of which 18%Continue reading “Factoid of the day: qual is worth $6.37billion a year”

Bitter-sweet at the Summer Solstice

Don’t forget, pagans and geography ‘O’ level-takers of Britain, it’s the Summer Solstice today. That is, the “longest day of the year”. Actually, I am a bit surprised we don’t all make more of this, one of the four big natural milestones of the year (with the Winter Solstice and the two Equinoxes). After all,Continue reading “Bitter-sweet at the Summer Solstice”

StickK: Odysseus on an electronic mast

I came across this site via a behavourial economist, Dr. Ivo Vlaev (thanks!), who was a co-collaborator on a rather large BE-influenced study I’ve been helping out on over the last year. It’s one of the many sites out there using BE principles to, it is hoped, help empower people to do things they wantContinue reading “StickK: Odysseus on an electronic mast”

Running Out Of Cass?

Cass Sunstein Q&A on Radio 4’s “Analysis” programme Here’s a top-up for behavioural economics enthusiasts: Edward Stourton hosts a Radio 4 programme on how the use of Nudge theory in government has gone so far – “liberal paternalism“, if you’re into squaring circles – with Nudge co-author and erstwhile Obama White House insider Cass Sunstein.Continue reading “Running Out Of Cass?”

Different Class

BBC research: new UK “class” system Our traditional three classes are now seven. A research unit within the BBC, BBC Lab UK, has conducted a study delving into class identity in Britain to come up with a more meaningful, contemporary sets of groupings. Prof Mike Savage of the London School of Economics and Prof FionaContinue reading “Different Class”

A Dickensian Present

Theatre Alibi: The Curiosity Shop Sometimes you get a serendipitous coming together of your work with something in the culture. This week I’ve been clocking up the miles doing social research in some of the less frequented corners of the land, interviewing financially vulnerable people at home; and last night, the smell of second-hand roll-upContinue reading “A Dickensian Present”

Scarfolk: beautiful (and very funny) images of a bewitched 70s Middle England dystopia

Occasionally something pops into my view on twitter that’s worth a read and very occasionally I make a real discovery – or rather various illustrious twitterati have. I came across Scarfolk last night via a recommendation from Caitlin Moran‘s twitter feed, started exploring it and, well, it is just a delight: Scarfolk website. The conceitContinue reading “Scarfolk: beautiful (and very funny) images of a bewitched 70s Middle England dystopia”