Queer as false memory syndrome

As I get older – which I gather many other people are also doing – I become ever more interested in popular and, even more so, unpopular folk traditions. Tomorrow is a belter of a day in the folk weirdness calendar: May Day. It’s like a clarion call for every nut job in the landContinue reading “Queer as false memory syndrome”

Blame and its illusions: an RSA Short by Brené Brown

Quite funny this: This is from a talk at the RSA, in which the American sociologist and writer explains the toxicity of blame. Not only is blaming people not usually really about some right-minded demand for accountability, it tends towards the opposite. Seen for what it is: Blame is simply the discharging of discomfort andContinue reading “Blame and its illusions: an RSA Short by Brené Brown”

Another great election tool (and it’s not a politician)

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/ng-interactive/2015/apr/20/election-2015-constituency-map The Grauniad has a nice interactive tool on the website now, allowing you to check the polls constituency by constituency (click on the link above). I also like the UK map on there a lot, which is morphed to reflect where most people live. It’s a great antidote to those more strictly territorial mapsContinue reading “Another great election tool (and it’s not a politician)”

A light buzz year: to infographics and beyond

I came across a link to this today while browsing the wonderful @brainpickings by Maria Popova. I know 2013 is so last year, but still – some brilliant visualisations of data on here. These examples are American, but no less interesting for that. I love the vote-weighted electoral map and the wind map in particular.Continue reading “A light buzz year: to infographics and beyond”

Which party will Calm Persistence favour?

I was interested to hear on The World At One the other day about the voter segmentation Populus (who have advised the Conservatives) have been using: BBC on Populus voter segmentation. There’s a test on there so you can see which category you’re in. The Populus segments are: 1. Comfortable Nostalgia: “They tend to be older,Continue reading “Which party will Calm Persistence favour?”

Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not

Danny Baker’s Rockin’ Decades: The 70s Slumped in front of the tv last night after a long day of fieldwork about energy usage in Worcestershire, I got Peter Hooked into Danny Baker’s pop music o’ the past chat programme on BBC4, Danny Baker’s Rockin’ Decades. Despite the (I have to assume deliberately) naff title, itContinue reading “Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not”

Have you done the triangular ironing yet?

You can have it fast, good, or cheap. Pick two. Oliver Burkeman’s latest This Column Will Change Your Life piece for the Guardian Weekend magazine is about this formula, or “the iron triangle” as it is sometimes called. Oliver Burkeman in Guardian Weekend: Constraints Can Be Liberating. It encapsulates neatly the problem with imagining you can have itContinue reading “Have you done the triangular ironing yet?”

From the archives: God’s gift to British advertising

Call me old school, but for me George Whitebread is still unrivalled as an all-round ad man. In this masterclass, he shows himself to be both an astute critic and a brilliantly original creative in his own right. Though his Yorkshire accent does slip a little towards the end. I delved back into the HarryContinue reading “From the archives: God’s gift to British advertising”

Too much choice?

Peter Curran hosts an interesting debate on whether too much choice is actually bad for society, on the iai online tv channel. Making the case is Renata Salecl, opposing is Lou Marinoff and somewhere between them is Lynne Segal. Choice: debate from the Institute of Art and Ideas